Sneak Peek: Cleaning Out Kailua’s Attic: Trash or Treasure? (Coming May 17, 2015)

Have you ever found a stash of antiquated tools, wonderful vintage postcards, or newspaper archives yellowed with age?  Do you wonder if these items have historical interest beyond your own family? Are you baffled about how to best store them or donate them?  Mark your calendars and start thinking of good questions about archiving and sorting historical items in your family or personal collections.  We will be having our next event on May 17 at 3:00 at Faith Baptist Church. Desoto Brown has agreed to come to speak on our theme, “Cleaning Out Kailua’s Attic: Trash or Treasure?”   More details to come soon.

September 23 Meeting – Honoring the Departed

 

The absence of a central, public cemetery in Kailua today, unlike Kāneʻohe, should not suggest that our ahupuaʻa was devoid of human burials. Many remains—both pre-contact and later—have been found widely throughout our community by natural exposure and construction disturbance. In fact, iwi continue to be exposed in the center of town as the Target property, the adjacent housing complex, and the former Arby’s site have witnessed probes beneath the soil. Archaeological monitoring has been required by the state, anticipating that human remains would be uncovered.

How should such “discoveries” be handled? Where should re-interment be made? What protocol should be used? Who should preside over these transfers? What patterns of ancient burials are suggested? Further, where were/are family cemeteries located within Kailua? Have others been bulldozed away during road and building construction?

Present to discuss such questions will be Nanette Napoleon, June Cleghorn, family representatives, caretakers, and current Iwi Council members.

In the context of the formulation of the Master Plan for Kawainui Marsh, it seems especially appropriate that consideration be given for a final resting place for Kailua’s ancestors.

SEPTEMBER 23, 7:00 – 9:00pm

TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

(875 Auloa Rd.)

 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED

Kailua’s Rock: December, 2013 Meeting

DECEMBER 10, 2013 • 7:00 – 9:00 pm
LANIKAI ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

The program is open to the public.

photot of Kailua's Rock

Among the many boulders of Kailua’s ahupuaʻa, the best known and most celebrated is “Lanikai Rock.” Visible to the earliest Hawaiian seafarers, this promontory–called Alāla, stood like a motionless sentinel, inviting travelers of every kind to recognize its sacred prominence, for its name meant “Awakening”. From this vantage point one could (and still can) see in one panoramic sweep the outline of the entire ahupuaʻa, all the way to the base of Konahuanui, descending down to the waters of Mōkapu. Continue reading