Publications

The Kailua Historical Society has several items available for purchase.

Kailua – Hard Cover Book

photo of Kailua book cover In 2010 the Society published KAILUA which takes readers on a journey through the historical and contemporary landscape of the ahupuaʻa of Kailua, from Hawaiian settlement through statehood, guided by the personal and deeply affectionate reflections of kamaʻāina, past and present. We are in the second printing with an expanded index and an index of place names.

248 pp, 180 illustrations. 9 x 10.5 “, hard cover, dust-jacketed book.

The books are available in stores around Kailua and by mail from KHS. To purchase, please click here to download the Order Form and follow the instructions.

Kailua Historical Booklets

photo of Kailua Historical Society Booklets

Booklets for sale by the Kailua Historical Society:

Old Time Lanikai/Kailua
Jiro Tanabe recounts his life growing up in Kailua from the 1920′s to modern times–times when Lanikai was nothing but sand, when today’s Kailua town was mostly coconut grove and papaya farm and Enchanted Lakes was marsh land — times when few people lived in Kailua and Jiro knew where everyone lived. Illustrated with photos from those early times.

Highlights of Kailua’s History
Beginning with its formation from a massive volcano and its early settlement by Polynesian explorers, major events in Kailua town’s history are recounted. Learn about its early days as an agricultural community, a huge cattle ranch, its dairy farmers and the many events that led to its present day role as a residential community. Illustrated with photos from the 1920′s to 1960.

Kailua way back when…Florence’s Restaurant was the place to go
Come along as we explore post-WWII Kailua where a newly wed Italian immigrant couple, Gerardo and Florence Jovinelli, fell in love with Kailua, bought a home on beautiful Kailua Beach and started Florence’s Restaurant which was to become a favorite eating place and center of social activities for Kailua’s people. Richly illustrated with some nineteen photos from that era.

Kawainui Marsh: Past, Present, Future
This great fresh water marsh of some 1,000 acres sitting just mauka of Kailua town is explored as a significant archeological site of early Hawaiian culture, as a flood control and filter of the millions of gallons of water flowing daily from the Koʻolau’s to Kailua Bay and as a rich biological site of plants and animals. Illustrated with maps, photos of cultural sites and beautiful water cooler renditions by artist Tamara Moan of the Marsh’s four bird species native to Hawaiʻi.

The History of St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church
This booklet traces the founding and development on one of Kailua’s early churches. As the Kailua community of the 1920′s, a community of dairy farms, cattle ranches and watermelon patches, began to grow, pioneer residents drawn to the area included Portuguese, Spanish, Puerto Rican and Filipino immigrants. These workers, from predominately Catholic backgrounds increased the drive to build a Catholic church to serve their families. Richly illustrated with photos of the church, its parishioners and line drawings by artist Mary Lineweber.

Windward Senior Day Care Center
This is the heart warming story of the founding of a facility to provide a safe and affordable place for elders who were left to their own devices during the day when their family caregivers were at work. The story recounts the efforts of a small group of socially conscious volunteers who recognized the need for such a service in the early 1970′s, their success in using charitable donations along with various government agencies and the dedication of scores of volunteers to provide loving care to Kailua’s senior citizens. This booklet is replete with photos of the Center’s staff and its seniors at play and testimonials from the families who have used its services over the years.

Booklets can be purchased by contacting KHS.

One thought on “Publications

  1. Can anyone tell me about a local news paper called “The Windward News”? The paper was a weekly news paper and was housed in the Davis building in 1949.

    Mahalo

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